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Annual Meeting 2014

CME Program

This event is approved for up to 26 credits by the Office for Continuing Health Professional Education (CHPE).  The Office for CHPE, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University is fully accredited by the Committee on Accreditation of Canadian Medical Education (CACME).

This event is an Accredited Group Learning Activity as defined by the Maintenance of Certification program of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

Through an agreement between the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the American Medical Association, physicians may convert Royal College MOC credits to AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Information on the process to convert Royal College MOC credit to AMA credit can be found at www.ama-assn.org/go/internationalcme.

Each physician should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

If you wish to participate in the CME Program you must Register for the Teratology Society Annual Meeting and inform the headquarters office of your participation. All participants are required to provide their full name, license number, and their complete contact information. Click here to access online CME Info Form. CME Program participants will also be required to sign in on the daily sign-in sheets and designate the credit type and credit quantity. Failure to do this will make the participant ineligible to receive CME credits.

Daily Breakdown of CME Credits
The following is the daily breakdown of credits available. Each attendee is responsible for claiming credit commensurate with the extent of your participation in the scientific activities.

Saturday, June 28: 6 credits
Sunday, June 29: 4.25 credits
Monday, June 30: 6.5 credits
Tuesday, July 1: 5.25 credits
Wednesday, July 2: 4 credits

2014 Teratology Society CME Program
Hyatt Regency BellevueBellevue, Washington

Saturday, June 28, 2014

   

8:45 AM–12:00 Noon

Education Course Session 1 – Grand Ballroom E

 

(Separate Registration Required)

 

Frontiers in Developmental Biology

   
8:45 AM–9:30 AM Effects of the Microbiome on Embryonic and Postembryonic Development
  Kjersti M. Aagaard, Baylor College of Medicine
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to define core concepts of the microbiome and human health; acquaint themselves with methodologies of microbiome and metagenomics research; demonstrate how variations in the microbiome occur during pregnancy; and discuss implications for development.
   
9:30 AM–10:15 AM Genomic Approaches to Understanding Normal and Abnormal Brain Development: From Human to Animal Models and Back
  Maximillian Muenke, National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will have a greater understanding of the application of genomic technologies to the study of brain development and the use of animal models in the study of normal and abnormal development of the human brain.
   
10:15 AM–10:30 AM Break
   
10:30 AM–11:15 AM The Role of Cilia in Development
  Jacqui Tabler, The University of Texas, Austin
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will have an understanding of the important role of cilia in normal embryonic development. Through a discussion of human ciliopathies, attendees will gain a better understanding of the connection between cilia and craniofacial development.
   
11:15 AM–12:00 Noon The Role of Nutrition in Embryo/Fetal Development
  Carl L. Keen, University of California
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will learn about the role of the mother's diet in embryonic and fetal development and will be introduced to the acute and long-term consequences of micronutrient deficiency during development.
   

1:35 PM–4:50 PM

Education Course Session 2 – Grand Ballroom E

 

(Separate Registration Required)

  Mechanisms of Abnormal Embryonic Development
   
1:35 PM–2:20 PM Oxidative Stress in Abnormal Embryonic and Fetal Brain Development
  Peter Wells, University of Toronto
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will understand the nature of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and how they are formed in the embryo and fetal brain; how ROS and oxidative stress can alter signal transduction and oxidatively damage cellular macromolecules (lipid, protein, RNA, DNA) leading to abnormal development; and, how the balance among ROS formation and detoxification, and repair of cellular macromolecules within the embryo and fetus can determine individual risk.
   
2:20 PM–3:05 PM Epigenetics
  Barbara F. Hales, McGill University
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will learn about the variety of epigenetic marks that regulate gene expression, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNAs. Discussion will focus on our understanding of the effects of reproductive or developmental toxicants on the epigenome and the possibility that changes in these marks have an impact on subsequent generations.
   
3:05 PM–3:20 PM Break
   
3:20 PM–4:05 PM Cellular Signal Transduction Pathways
  Carolyn Kapron, Trent University
  Learning Objectives: Participants will become familiar with the major signal transduction pathways and their roles in normal embryonic development, as well as understand how disruptions in signal transduction pathways can lead to the induction of abnormalities by embryotoxic compounds. They will learn that the primary consequences of pathway disruption include alterations in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and cell migration that, in turn, interfere with the normal processes of embryonic development, leading to malformations or embryonic death.
   
4:05 PM–4:50 PM Gene Regulatory Networks
  Michael D. Collins, University of California, Los Angeles
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will have a better understanding of the definition of a developmental gene regulatory network (GRN) and appreciation of how the GRN can contribute to a mechanistic characterization of teratogenesis.
   

Sunday, June 29, 2014

   

8:15 AM–9:00 AM

Josef Warkany Lecture – Grand Ballroom A

 

Teratology v2.0: Building a Path Forward

 

Thomas B. Knudsen, National Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA

  Learning Objectives: Attendees will have a better understanding of: (1) the challenges and opportunities associated with utilizing complex data for teratological prediction; (2) strategies to interact big-data with principles of teratology for hypothesis generation for adverse outcome pathway elucidation; and (3) spatio-temporal prediction utilizing the major organizing principles of dosimetry, criticality, and susceptibility.
   
1:30 PM–2:00 PM F. Clarke Fraser New Investigator Award – Grand Ballroom A
  From Computational Approaches to an Alternative Animal Model and Epidemiology: Building a Fulfilling Research Career
  Julia M. Gohlke, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will be presented a computational approach in neurodevelopmental toxicology, development of an alternative animal model for evaluating early life effects, and an epidemiological approach to examine the association between extreme heat events and preterm birth. The utility of these diverse approaches in building a research career will be discussed.
   
3:00 PM–5:15 PM ILSI HESI Symposium – Grand Ballroom A
  Cross-Industry Data Survey of the Value of Rabbit Developmental Toxicity Data in the Risk Assessment for Pharmaceutics
   
3:00 PM–3:30 PM An Analysis of Rat and Rabbit Developmental Toxicity Studies for Pharmaceuticals: The Scientific Background
  Aldert H. Piersma, National Institute for Public Health (RIVM)
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will learn about the historic and scientific background to the ongoing retrospective analysis of rat and rabbit developmental toxicity studies for pharmaceutical compounds, leading into the specific research questions of the project and a brief outlook into possible regulatory consequences.
   
3:30 PM–3:45 PM Break
   
3:45 PM–4:15 PM A Comprehensive Data Survey of the Relative Value of Rat versus Rabbit Developmental Toxicity Data in the Risk Assessment for Pharmaceuticals: Presentation of Results
  Peter Theunissen, National Institute for Public Health (RIVM) and University of Applied Sciences Utrecht and Aldert H. Piersma, National Institute for Public Health (RIVM)
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will have a better understanding of the results of the retrospective analysis of differences and similarities in prediction of rat and rabbit developmental toxicity studies for pharmaceutical compounds.
   
4:15 PM–4:45 PM Break
   
4:45 PM–5:15 PM Regulatory Perspective: How Might the Risk Assessment of Novel Drugs and Regulatory Decisions Profit from the Results of This Survey?
  Sonja Beken, Federal Agency for Medicines and Health Products, Belgium
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will have a better understanding of how the results of the analysis of the value of rabbit versus rat embryofetal developmental data could aid in the development of a novel risk assessment strategy for embryofoetal development testing for human pharmaceuticals. Regulatory steps towards the revision of the ICH guideline S5(R2): Detection of Toxicity to Reproduction for Medicinal Products and Toxicity to Male Fertility will be elaborated upon.
   
2:30 PM–5:15 PM TS/NBTS Joint Symposium – Grand Ballroom I

 

National Children’s Study

   
2:30 PM–2:55 PM An Integrated Framework for Linking Exposure and Phenotypic Data in the National Children’s Study
  Steven Hirschfeld, National Children's Study
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will become familiar with data collection and analytic methodologies that integrate exposure and outcome data for longitudinal studies.
   
2:55 PM–3:20 PM Streamlining the Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder for the National Children's Study
  Wendy Stone, University of Washington
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to describe the early behavioral expression of autism spectrum disorders, the challenges of making an early diagnosis, and a novel approach to facilitate community-based detection at age three.
   
3:20 PM–3:45 PM Results of Whole-Genome Analysis from National Children’s Study (NCS)
  Elaine M. Faustman, University of Washington
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will gain an understanding of genomic analysis options for the NCS. Emphasize the optimization of whole genome analysis in the NCS. Describe the importance of genomic factors in normal development and within a lifestage exposure context. Identify genomic factors that may act as common as well as unique susceptibility factors to environmental exposures and diseases. Discuss the potential for future research opportunities as the NCS moves forward.
   
3:45 PM–4:00 PM Break
   
4:00 PM–4:25 PM Novel Insights on the Molecular Targets of Environmental Exposures during Pregnancy Using Placental Multi’omics Data Integration in the National Children’s Study (NCS)
  Kjersti M. Aagaard, Baylor College of Medicine
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to define high throughput genomic advances and discuss those genomic advances which were undertaken with the NCS formative research initiatives.
   
4:25 PM–4:50 PM Environmental Exposures during Pregnancy: US National Children’s Study Formative Research Investigation
  Richard K. Miller, University of Rochester
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will have a better understanding of how to develop state of the art techniques for acquiring biologic specimens at delivery from sites across the US for analyses of environmental contaminants. Examine the importance of establishing contaminant levels in biological tissues as biomarkers of exposure and effect. Be able to review at least three environmental contaminants, there possible origins, actions and distribution during pregnancy.
   
4:50 PM–5:15 PM Integration of Biological Cortisol Concentrations and Stress Questionnaires As a Marker of Maternal Stress
  Shirley A. Beresford and Marissa N. Smith, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and University of Washington
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will understand some of the adverse effects of maternal stress. Describe ways in which psychosocial and neighborhood factors are related to urinary cortisol concentrations. Define critical windows of susceptibility to stress exposure. Describe potential impacts on obesity development in women later in life.
   
 

Monday, June 30, 2014

   

8:00 AM–9:00 AM

TS/NBTS Joint Special Lecture – Grand Ballroom A

 

Systems Medicine and Proactive P4 Medicine: Revolution in Healthcare

 

Lecturer: Leroy Hood, Institute for Systems Biology

  Learning Objectives: Attendees will have a better understanding of how systems medicine deals with the complexity of disease. Gaining insights into how systems medicine is transforming healthcare. Understanding how P4 medicine and evidence-based medicine differ fundamentally in their approach to patients.
   
9:05 AM–11:40 AM March of Dimes Symposium – Grand Ballroom A
  Advances in Early Diagnosis of Birth Defects and Adverse Perinatal Outcomes
   
9:05 AM–9:40 AM Smart Skin Sensors and Analytics in the Cloud to Advance the Frontiers of Wearable Health
  Todd P. Coleman, University of California, San Diego
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to describe the practical and clinical benefits of continuous monitoring of biological functions in pregnant women and neonates. Explain research applications of epidermal electronics in pregnancy and newborns. Determine current limitations in wireless transmission of data from epidermal electronics.
   
9:40 AM–10:15 AM Screening for Birth Defects and Teratogen Risks with Ultrasonography in Early Gestation
  William F. Rayburn, University of New Mexico
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to identify the value and limitations of ultrasound imaging during early gestation.
   
10:15 AM–10:30 AM Break
   
10:30 AM–11:05 AM The Role of the First Trimester Fetal Echocardiography in Identification of Birth Defects
  Lynn L. Simpson, Columbia University
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will have a better understanding of the risk factors for congenital heart disease and the indications for early fetal echocardiography in clinical practice.
   
11:05 AM–11:40 AM Fetal MRI As an Adjunct to Second Trimester Ultrasound.
  Jennifer A. Jolley, University of Washington
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to discuss timing and indications for use of MRI in prenatal diagnosis. Understand strengths of MRI as a diagnostic modality in pregnancy and summarize the limitations of ultrasound and MRI in fetal imaging.
   
1:30 PM–2:30 PM TS/NBTS Joint Elsevier Distinguished Lecturer – Grand Ballroom A

 

Epigenetic Mechanisms in Intellectual Developmental Disabilities

 

Lecturer: J. David Sweatt, The University of Alabama, Birmingham School Medicine

  Learning Objectives: Attendees will have a better understanding of basic background concerning epigenetic molecular mechanisms in the nervous system; recent results implicating epigenetic mechanisms in memory formation; and new discoveries concerning how DNA methylation is regulated in the adult nervous system.
   
2:45 PM–5:15 PM TS/NBTS Joint Symposium – Grand Ballroom A
  Epigenetics
   
2:45 PM–3:30 PM Environmentally Induced Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Disease: Ancestral Ghosts in Your Genome
  Michael K. Skinner, Washington State University
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will have a better understanding of the role environmental epigenetics has in disease etiology and if your ancestors’ exposures can promote disease in you and your grandchildren.
   
3:30 PM–3:45 PM Break
   
3:45 PM–4:30 PM Chromatin Remodeling, miRNAs, and Determination of Neurogenic Cell Fate
  Andrew S. Yoo, Washington University School of Medicine
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to understand how small RNA molecules, microRNAs, mediate changes in the subunit composition of chromatin remodeling complexes during neural development and learn about how ectopic expression of these microRNAs reprograms non-neuronal cells directly towards neuronal fate. Examples of the microRNA-mediated neuronal reprogramming into specific neuronal subtypes will be also discussed.
   
4:30 PM–5:15 PM Mechanisms of MicroRNA Function in Fetal Neural Stem Cells: Implications for Ethanol Teratology
  Rajesh C. Miranda, Texas A&M Health Science Center
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will learn about a class of nonprotein coding RNAs called microRNAs (miRNAs) and about cell biological mechanisms that miRNAs control. They will learn about the role of miRNAs in fetal development and maternal-fetal health. Discussion will focus on the regulation of miRNAs within the context of the specific teratogenic effects of drugs of abuse like alcohol and nicotine. Finally, attendees will be exposed to current research that implicates miRNAs as mediators of teratogenesis.
 
 

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

 

 

7:45 AM–8:30 AM

Sunrise Mini Course – Grand Ballroom E

 

(Separate Registration Required)

  Applications of Computational Toxicology in the Study of Birth Defects
   
7:45 AM–8:30 AM How are Computational Toxicology Methods Used to Prioritize Compounds for Testing?
  Thomas B. Knudsen, National Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will be introduced to predictive models of developmental toxicology and how computational toxicology methods are used to prioritize chemicals for further testing.
   

8:30 AM–9:00 AM

TS/NBTS Joint Special Lecture – Grand Ballroom A

 

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

  Kenneth Lyons Jones, University of California, San Diego and MotherToBaby
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will learn how prenatal alcohol exposure is associated with a spectrum of defects that includes fetal alcohol syndrome at the most severe end and alcohol related neurodevelopmental defects at the most mild end.
   
9:15 AM–12:00 Noon Testicular Dysgenesis Syndrome Symposium – Grand Ballroom A
   
9:15 AM–9:45 AM Genetic and Environmental Regulation of External Genital Development
  Martin J. Cohn, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and University of Florida
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will gain an understanding of the molecular genetic mechanisms that regulate normal and abnormal development of the penis and urethral tube, and understand how environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals can interfere with these mechanisms to induce hypospadias.
   
9:45 AM–10:15 AM Cryptorchidism Susceptibility in Pediatric Patients and in Animal Models
  Julia S. Barthold, Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will have a better understanding of the regulation of testicular descent and of genetic and environmental risk factors for cryptorchidism.
   
10:15 AM–10:30 AM Break
   
10:30 AM–11:00 AM Hypospadias: An Overview of Risk Factors and Etiologies
  Suzan L. Carmichael, Stanford University
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will obtain a solid background regarding the epidemiology of hypospadias, including its prevalence, trends over time, and potential risk factors.
   
11:00 AM–11:30 AM Computational Modeling and Predictive Toxicology of Hypospadias
  Maxwell C. K. Leung, National Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will have a better understanding of the mechanism of hypospadias in the context of an adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework, and how to use a computational model to predict the action of chemical agents that distrupts male reproductive tract development.
   
11:30 AM–12:00 Noon 3-D In Vitro Models and Systems Biology: The Phthalate Syndrome As a Case Example
  Elaine M. Faustman, University of Washington
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will understand the need for systems based approaches for developmental in vitro toxicology and define the need for consideration of organotypic cell cultures that reflect the dynamics of cell populations across developmental stages in order to better understand potential and type of in vivo responses. Normal as well as chemical perturbations in these dynamic processes will be discussed and attendees will gain an understanding of the importance of using biological context when interpreting in vitro models. Attendees will be able to discuss the benefits of using a 3-D culture system when extrapolating to whole animal studies and human populations; identify critical windows of susceptibility to phthalate exposure using developmental biological context; and describe the integration of in vitro and in vivo data for understanding impacts on testis.
   
1:30 PM–2:30 PM TS/ETS Exchange Lecture – Grand Ballroom A
  Is Lack of Mandatory Folic Acid Fortification Public Health Malpractice?
   
  European Teratology Society: The Impact of Spina Bifida on Individuals, Families, and Society
  Margo L. Whiteford, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde
  Learning Objectives: Participants will know that spina bifida has a major impact on the lives of affected individuals and their families, resulting in physical disability, social exclusion and financial hardship. Participants will know that in many European countries 90% of pregnancies are terminated following prenatal diagnosis of spina bifida. Participants will know that the majority of women fail to take folic acid supplements prior to conceiving.
   
  Teratology Society: Accelerating the Pace of Preventing Spina Bifida F and Anencephaly F
  Godfrey P. Oakley Jr., Emory University
  Learning Objectives: Participants will know that 400 micrograms of folic acid will prevent all of spina bifida F and anencephaly F. Participants will know that mandatory folic acid fortification has been implemented in 70 countries and caused total or near total prevention in the 70 countries. Participants will know that each year 180,000 pregnancies are affected by these preventable birth defects—18 times as many children affected each year as the 10,000 in total damaged by thalidomide. Participants will know that they can be the leaders that get mandatory folic acid fortification required in their countries.
 

 

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

 

 

8:00 AM–8:30 AM

Robert L. Brent Lecture: Teratogen Update – Grand Ballroom A

 

Teratology and Public Health: Working Together to Make Recommendations for Pregnant Women in the Face of Uncertainty

  Lecturer: Sonja A. Rasmussen, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will have a better understanding of previous initiatives in which teratologists and public health professionals have worked together to improve the health of mothers and infants and of the recent progress made in these areas. Attendees will be able discuss challenges to making public health recommendations when data on which to base those recommendations are sparse, and understand approaches to weighing the risks and benefits in these situations.
   
8:40 AM–11:25 AM Wiley-Blackwell Symposium – Grand Ballroom A
  From Fleas to Fish and Beyond: Advances in Alternative Assays to Predict Developmental Toxicity
   
8:40 AM–9:10 AM Prediction of Developmental Toxicity Using Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells on Environmental Chemicals
  E. Sid Hunter III, US Environmental Protection Agency
  Learning Objectives: Attendee will be able to understand the consequences of chemical exposure on differentiation and cytotoxicity in mouse embryonic stem cells. The concepts of lineage specification and chemical-induced lineage selective effects will be used to introduce differentiation. Discussion of extrapolation between model systems will focus on the consequences of chemical exposure on embryonic stem cells and those in vivo following administration to laboratory animals.
   
9:10 AM–9:40 AM Daphnia as a Whole-Animal Invertebrate Model System for Human Health Research
  Julia M. Gohlke, University of Alabama, Birmingham
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will learn the unique characteristics of Daphnia pulex that make it a particularly appealing model system for exploring long-term effects of early life exposures, epigenetic mechanisms, and transgenerational effects.
   
9:40 AM–10:25 AM Break
   
10:25 AM–10:55 AM Development of a C. elegans Assay to Characterize the Effects of Toxicants on Growth, Reproduction, and Development
  Jonathan Freedman, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
  Learning Objective: Attendees will learn some of the advantages in using C. elegans as an alternative organism for toxicological testing. They will learn some of the steps necessary for the development of these assays, as well as the importance of rigorous data analysis.
   
10:55 AM–11:25 AM Using Embryonic Zebrafish and Multidimensional Screening to Evaluate Neurobehavioral Toxicity and Teratology
  Robert Tanguay, Oregon State University
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to understand why nonmammalian vertebrate models such as zebrafish offer tremendous opportunities to identify hazardous chemicals and to understand how these chemicals interact with molecular pathways to produce adverse outcomes. There will be increased awareness to the value of in vivo phenotypic anchoring to guide mechanistic evaluations. Finally, they will learn how high throughput in vivo assessments accelerate the pace to achieving the goals for toxicity testing for the 21st century.
   

1:30 PM–4:20 PM

Public Affairs Committee Symposium – Grand Ballroom A

 

Thrombosis during Pregnancy: Risks, Prevention, and Treatment for Mother and Fetus

   
1:30 PM–1:45 PM Thrombosis: Molecular Mechanisms, Clinical Picture, and Treatment Options during Pregnancy: An Introduction
  Lisa Soule and Evi Struble, US Food and Drug Administration
  Learning Objectives: The participants will be provided with a brief introduction to the underlying molecular mechanisms of thrombosis and why thrombosis is a concern during pregnancy. Existing and emerging treatment paradigms for thrombosis during pregnancy will be briefly discussed, with the overall goal of providing a context for the presentations that will follow.
   
1:45 PM–2:20 PM Thrombosis in Pregnancy and Maternal Outcomes
  Andra H. James, University of Virginia
  Learning Objectives: The attendees will be able to appreciate the increased incidence of, recognize the risk factors for, and understand the maternal consequences of thrombosis in pregnancy.
   
2:20 PM–2:55 PM Thrombophilia in Pregnancy and Fetal Outcome: Special Emphasis on Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APLS)
  Sarah Gloria Obican, Columbia University and Asher Ornoy, Israel Ministry of Health and Hebrew University
  Learning Objectives: Autoimmune diseases, especially SLE, may interfere with fertility and increase pregnancy complications. These are often caused by the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies, increasing the rate of spontaneous abortions or intrauterine death. As these complications are in direct relation to the level of the antiphospholipid antibodies, treatment is by reducing their concentrations. The purpose of the talk is to discuss these processes and understand the way of prevention.
   
2:55 PM–3:10 PM Break
   
3:10 PM–3:45 PM Management of Thrombosis in Pregnancy
  Barbara A. Konkle, Puget Sound Blood Center and University of Washington
  Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to describe approaches to diagnosis of thrombosis during pregnancy and use of anticoagulants in this setting; learn of controversies in monitoring of anticoagulants during pregnancy and in treatment of the obese pregnant patient; and understand determinants for length of treatment and implications for subsequent pregnancies.
   
3:45 PM–4:20 PM Harvesting the Power of `Omic Technology, Biomarkers, and In Vitro or In Vivo Models to Facilitate the Treatment of Thrombosis
  Michael Paidas, MD, Yale University
  Learning Objectives: The attendee will gain a better understanding of genomic, proteomic, metabolomic, transcriptosomic and epigenomic technologies, as well as biomarkers as they relate to the detection, prevention and treatment of thrombosis in the mother and fetus. They will be able to describe promising in vitro and in vivo models that advance our capability to prevent or treat thrombosis impacting the mother and fetus.
   
   
 
 

 

 

 

 

 




Rev. Thursday, May 15, 2014; at 11:02:51 PM EDT
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